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hobiee

To bleed or not to bleed, that is the question ?

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Just trying to start up a convo on something I've pondered in the past.  Ok so you roll your bike of choice up the ramp and cinch those tie downs tight for the ride home.  Do you bleed the forks??   If yes, why ?  If no, why not ?  You have just unloaded your bike after driving up to the mountains to ride.  It's been strapped down tight for a few hours, do you hit the bleeders to "acclimate" your forks to the new environment?  Why or why not ?   Been doing a bunch of hard laps on the track and you roll into the pits and throw it up on the stand for a rest,  hit those bleeders ?     What exactly are we doing when we do this ?   How does air get in there in the first place ?   Why does it build pressure ?  Are we saving our fork seals by doing this ?   What happens if we never even take those pesky little screws out and put the fancy bleeders in and never ever touch anything but th ie clickers ?   I have way to much time on my hands.........

 

PS  I have learned a ton on suspension in the last few years and I seriously think it is probably the most important part of what we do in order to feel comfortable on our ride of choice.  It truly can make or break a ride or a great ride in my opinion.

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8rWSPVW.gif

 

I'm a luddite in terms of suspension. I was riding hard in the dez last year and my forks started to audibly grunt upon compression impact. While stopped on the trail I decided to let air out the forks (bike Not on a stand) and air hissed out. It definitely changed the fork feeling but I'm too dumb to tell exactly what. I've also never touched my clickers...

 

I've read equalizing pressure in the fork with bike suspended is healthy. Air takes up space, just like oil level height

 

 

Show me the way!

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I don’t know, do new bikes come with the bleeders from the factory?  My thought is it helps minimally but it’s not necessary.

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on the race track I feel the difference.  As the oil heats up, air pressure builds and creates basically a preload to my understanding.  I am not a suspension guy but I spent many many many thousands on suspension on my race bike(s) and when I get them re-tuned from Enzo, they always ask if I bled, I ask why, and that's what was mentioned to me.

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On 9/22/2021 at 1:01 AM, Goofy Footer said:

8rWSPVW.gif

 

I'm a luddite in terms of suspension. I was riding hard in the dez last year and my forks started to audibly grunt upon compression impact. While stopped on the trail I decided to let air out the forks (bike Not on a stand) and air hissed out. It definitely changed the fork feeling but I'm too dumb to tell exactly what. I've also never touched my clickers...

 

I've read equalizing pressure in the fork with bike suspended is healthy. Air takes up space, just like oil level height

 

 

Show me the way!

In a perfect world our suspension would always be in a  vacuum  so to speak.  Operating under perfect conditions always. Good suspension set up can make the day.  I wonder how many people write a certain bike off cause they never get the boingers set up correctly.   People will spend thousands on exhaust or programers or oil or tires or a new seat or whatever.    Get the suspension set up period. Biggest improvement period !   Learn about whatever bike you have.  How rebound effects how comfortable you are how compression slows you down, how the two work together.    I can tell when a clicker is turned on click now and I'll bet I could tell when my forks have been bled or not.  Theres a ton that goes into suspension and it's sooooooo over looked in my opinion in the big picture.

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I bleed my forks once a year weather they need it or not, it sounds like letting the air out of a tire when I do.  The seals in my KTM only lasted 13 years though.

Don't forget to clean the dust seals regularly and try these...

 

 

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While George is the go to person for all thing suspension this is my understanding.
The Air Gap acts like a spring, if you were at sea level and went up to 9K feet that along would increase the pressure the air gap has in the forks.
Same with heating them up.

I tend to do it when I am riding on trips as I go from sea level to 8K or above and will be staying there for a few day (riding in CO for example).

It puts less strain on the seals if you release pressure but how much or is it really significant i don't know. And I am not a good enough rider to notice much of a difference unless the altitude change is very large, then the forks are just a little more harsh due to the higher pressure but that could also be my imagination.

Call and talk to George, he will take care of you esp if you need any work done, to say his work transforms the suspension on these bikes is an understatement, and that has been repeated by a number of people I have sent his way as well.

 

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7 hours ago, DSM8 said:

While George is the go to person for all thing suspension this is my understanding.
The Air Gap acts like a spring, if you were at sea level and went up to 9K feet that along would increase the pressure the air gap has in the forks.
Same with heating them up.

I tend to do it when I am riding on trips as I go from sea level to 8K or above and will be staying there for a few day (riding in CO for example).

It puts less strain on the seals if you release pressure but how much or is it really significant i don't know. And I am not a good enough rider to notice much of a difference unless the altitude change is very large, then the forks are just a little more harsh due to the higher pressure but that could also be my imagination.

Call and talk to George, he will take care of you esp if you need any work done, to say his work transforms the suspension on these bikes is an understatement, and that has been repeated by a number of people I have sent his way as well.

 

Oh Absolutely George is the guy to go to.  I've learned plenty from him.  I was just throwing all this out there for fun conversation is all.  I've gotten pretty darn good at tuning suspension and being able to tell what my suspension needs.  I have a 1090 currently that rides nicer than most folks 300 in the technical stuff.  People get on for a try out and come away in shock.  "That bike is soooooo easy to ride"  I have even had people tell me It's slow because its like riding on a magic carpet.  My 200 is even more amazing but thats just what a 200 does period.

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