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dirt dame

Prairie orphan checking in 09/23/22

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I sure miss all my home state riding venues and I always will.  Wyoming is a sparse, rugged and austere place, but there are tons of trails and jeep roads here.  A person can ride in most directions further than their fuel tank will allow, and never see a town, a building and sometimes another human being.  Lots of high desert, with little cover, crazy weather and high winds.  Almost no details of my life have remained the same since I moved here...except riding.
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Edited by dirt dame
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A stark beauty out there.  I hope the change is working out for you Mimi.  Is that the Missouri R. You are showing us?

 

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9 hours ago, Bagstr said:

A stark beauty out there.  I hope the change is working out for you Mimi.  Is that the Missouri R. You are showing us?

 

That is the Green River, which flows through the Flaming Gorge here in Wyoming.

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Super that you are still out roaming around on adventures,  Thanks for sharing the views!  Hope you are finding some of the best loops to share with us when we can get out that way. :)

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I really have been missing riding at Big Bear this summer, though I have been keeping up with all the storms, mudslides, washouts and wild fires  that have been disrupting and ruining that area lately.  I really miss the forest rides.  So yesterday, my riding buddy Kim took me out to Pine mountain to experience some forest riding up here.  It is less than an hour's drive south of Rock Springs, and it's like a tiny Alpine oasis sticking up out of an otherwise high desert landscape.  The desert is already  at 7000 feet in elevation, so riding on Pine mountain  brings you up to over 9000 feet.  From the south rim, you can see into the "Three Corners" area, where Wyoming, Colorado and Utah all meet.  In fact, there is a trail that lead off the mountain, and goes right to the marker monument.  We didn't ride down there, yesterday, but instead explored all the gnarly two tracks that ran through the mountain drainages.  Lots of aspen trees getting their first f all colors, and the forests are made up of mainly fir trees.  We found the trails not maintained to any real degree,  littered with washouts, rocks and trees.  We also found some abandoned cabins and a few small ponds.  It was pretty nice day, although I ended up with a head cold late in the day.  Oh well, we got germs up here too.

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Looks like a great area.

 

How late in the fall does riding season usually go before it gets too cold? 

Are you close to the Wyoming BDR trail?

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17 minutes ago, Goofy Footer said:

Looks like a great area.

 

How late in the fall does riding season usually go before it gets too cold? 

Are you close to the Wyoming BDR trail?

It depends on where you are.  High desert (southwest corner of state) gets cold, but not so much snow.  Places like Pine Mountain or any mountains high enough to support a forest will get snow pretty quick.  Also there are some wicked high winds up  this way.  The place can be unforgiving due to exposure.  Weather will turn on a dime.  Unless you are a local and riding familiar trails close to home, conditions could get pretty dicey really quick.  That being said, riding can be hit and miss all winter long around my area.

Not sure where the BDR goes through.

Edited by dirt dame

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Hi Mimi! Thanks for checking in and sharing your great ride reports. Good to hear you are adjusting to a huge lifestyle change. Wishing you all the best.

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@dirt dame this is the official BDR route. It is the most recent release of the BDR series so expect a number of SDAR and ADV folks rolling through here each summer.

 

from the BDR website:

The best time to ride the WYBDR is mid-July to mid-September. We do not recommend riding the route before July 1st due to seasonal road closures in the national forest, and the impassible roads at higher elevations prior to July.
 
The WYBDR uses forest roads and backroads that typically open sometime in July depending on the size of the lingering snowpack. Depending on the autumn snowfall, the route can become unrideable sometime in September. The highest points are at the top of Bridger Peak and Kennaday Peak (both optional) which are around 11,000 feet tall and can only be reachable in the middle part of the riding season (e.g. August and a little before and after). The Snowy Range can also hold snow well into summer, but Highway 130 is typically cleared so you can get through.

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2 hours ago, Goofy Footer said:

 

@dirt dame this is the official BDR route. It is the most recent release of the BDR series so expect a number of SDAR and ADV folks rolling through here each summer.

 

from the BDR website:

The best time to ride the WYBDR is mid-July to mid-September. We do not recommend riding the route before July 1st due to seasonal road closures in the national forest, and the impassible roads at higher elevations prior to July.
 
The WYBDR uses forest roads and backroads that typically open sometime in July depending on the size of the lingering snowpack. Depending on the autumn snowfall, the route can become unrideable sometime in September. The highest points are at the top of Bridger Peak and Kennaday Peak (both optional) which are around 11,000 feet tall and can only be reachable in the middle part of the riding season (e.g. August and a little before and after). The Snowy Range can also hold snow well into summer, but Highway 130 is typically cleared so you can get through.

Yeah, seems to go  through quite a bit east of where I am.

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Ongoing day rides.  It has snowed three times since the middle of October, so it is critical to get out and ride on any days that are above 35 degrees and with relatively little or no snow on the ground.  So here are few pictures form the last two rides that I have been on.  I got to use Bugz Beta, the Xtrainer 300 for them, as he now has officially become a street legal dual sport bike up here.  I probably won't be able to go on any more mountain rides, as the ranges will be holding too much snow and freezing temperatures for any winter excursions.  But the local desert will hold enough opportunities for day rides from time to time, throughout the winter season.   I just need to dress warm, and head out in the afternoon when daytime highs will peak.

Pffff....today....no ride....

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Bugzy's brand new street plate!

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Wide open spaces and White mountain in the background, last Sunday.

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We found an old blown out levee with old cars used to re enforce it...but it didn't work.

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Tuesday, we hit the area again, and visited the Boar's Tusk, saw an old abandoned ranch, did some bush whacking along the Killpecker dunes, rode the dunes and generally had a good time.

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Edited by dirt dame
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It looks like you're riding in places I thought no longer existed in America. So incredible, hope you keep taunting us with more reports and photos.

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Beautiful country you’ve got up there. 
 What’s your range on the. Beta?

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13 hours ago, bfar33 said:

It looks like you're riding in places I thought no longer existed in America. So incredible, hope you keep taunting us with more reports and photos.

I'll keep adding pictures to this post as we ride.

39 minutes ago, Wierdrider said:

Beautiful country you’ve got up there. 
 What’s your range on the. Beta?

The range is not so good.  Hard riding is about 50 miles.  Cruising the open plains...maybe 70.  Oversized tank only adds about a half gallon, so I haven't bothered to spend the money on one.

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So where are you Mimi? I know Wyoming but where? Looks high and flat. Glad you're riding.

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Just now, Uncle Champ said:

So where are you Mimi? I know Wyoming but where? Looks high and flat. Glad you're riding.

Southwest corner of the state.  Rock Springs.

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