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Riggerdan

Motorcycle lane-splitting rules unveiled

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I know theres only a handful of us that ride the pavement and or commute on our bikes

This is all basic common sense, but thought I would post for those who like to ride and don't like to break the law

Either way be careful out there.........

Motorcycle lane-splitting rules unveiled

http://www.sfgate.co...led-4270272.php

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I know theres only a handful of us that ride the pavement and or commute on our bikes

This is all basic common sense, but thought I would post for those who like to ride and don't like to break the law

Either way be careful out there.........

Motorcycle lane-splitting rules unveiled

http://www.sfgate.co...led-4270272.php

This is good, my girflriend just got a ticket for lane splitting last month. She was on her scooter on a 2 lane road. Cop cited her for 21750 - passing on the left. $240. Any ideas?

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I know theres only a handful of us that ride the pavement and or commute on our bikes

This is all basic common sense, but thought I would post for those who like to ride and don't like to break the law

Either way be careful out there.........

Motorcycle lane-splitting rules unveiled

http://www.sfgate.co...led-4270272.php

This is good, my girflriend just got a ticket for lane splitting last month. She was on her scooter on a 2 lane road. Cop cited her for 21750 - passing on the left. $240. Any ideas?

2 lanes going in the SAME direction? That is splitting lanes...

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Different directions. One each way.

I will let the LEOs answer this but it sounds like HEAD-ON trouble to me.

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The thing is it's only called "lane-splitting" in modern vernacular, it's not a technical term. I believe it's technically referred to as "lane sharing" which means two vehicles occupying one lane simultaneously. And you're not technically permitted to ride outside a single lane, or on the lines of the lane. Thus, this should qualify so long as she didn't cross the yellow.

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From what I know they use the term, "Safe and Prudent Manner." If the officer "feels" you were not operating in a safe and prudent manner you will probably be cited.

I saw this list yesterday and thought these are good ideas and guidelines that officers have probably used for awhile...

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It has to be two or more lanes same direction and broken white line .

Cann't be far left solid white or far right again solid line .

It has to between lanes, and I thought the law is 5mph slpitting and 10mph over taking/passing.

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SIMPLE!! Just don't do it.

Why take more chances of someone not paying attention and cutting in front of you or whatever.

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good post rigger!

READ THE RED AT THE BOTTOM YOU CAGE COMMUTING LANE HOG! :smile_anim:

...observed chp doing this down the 805 while looking for suckers texting and caging...

New guidelines...http://www.chp.ca.gov/programs/lanesplitguide.html

cmsp_logo.jpghttp://www.ca-msp.org/

Lane Splitting General Guidelines

Lane splitting in a safe and prudent manner is not illegal in the state of California.

The term lane splitting, sometimes known as lane sharing, filtering or white-lining, refers to the process of a motorcyclist riding between lanes of stopped or slower moving traffic or moving between lanes to the front of traffic stopped at a traffic light.

Motorcyclists who are competent enough riders to lane split, should follow these general guidelines if choosing to lane split:

1) Travel at a speed that is no more than 10 MPH faster than other traffic – danger increases at higher speed differentials.

- A speed differential of 10 miles per hour or less allows an alert, competent rider enough time to identify and react to most dangerous situations that can occur.

- The greater the speed differential, the less time a rider has to identify and react to a hazard.



2) It is not advisable to lane split when traffic flow is at 30 mph or faster --- danger increases as overall speed increases.

- At just 20 mph, in the 1 or 2 seconds it takes a rider to identify a hazard, that rider will travel approximately 30 to 60 feet before even starting to take evasive action. Actual reaction (braking or swerving) will take additional time and distance.

- Braking and stopping distance varies greatly based on a multitude of factors (rider, machine and environment).

- As speed increases, crash severity increases.



3) Typically, it is safer to split between the #1 and #2 lanes than between other lanes.

- Other road users are more accustomed to motorcycles splitting between the #1 and #2 (furthest left) lanes.

- Avoid splitting in lanes near freeway on-ramps and exits.

- Avoid splitting lanes when another motorcycle rider is splitting between other nearby lanes as cars may make additional room for one rider and accidentally reduce space for another.



4) Consider the total environment in which you are splitting, including the width of the lanes, size of surrounding vehicles, as well as roadway, weather, and lighting conditions.

- Some lanes are narrower than others, leaving little room to pass safely. If you can't fit, don't split.

- Some vehicles are wider than others -- it is not advisable to split near wide trucks. If you can't fit, don't split.

- Know the limitations of your motorcycle --- wide bars, fairing and bags require more space between vehicles. If you can't fit, don't split.

- Avoid splitting on unfamiliar roads to avoid surprises such as poor road surfaces.

- Seams in the pavement or concrete between lanes can be hazardous if they are wide or uneven.

- Poor visibility, due to darkness or weather conditions, makes it difficult for riders to see road hazards and makes it more difficult for drivers to see you.

- Help drivers see you by wearing brightly colored protective gear and using high beams during daylight.



5) Be alert and anticipate possible movements by other road users.

- Be very aware of what the cars around you are doing. If a space, or gap, opens up next to your lane, be prepared react accordingly.

- Always be prepared to take evasive action if a vehicle changes lanes.

- Account for inattentive or distracted drivers.

- Riders should not weave back and forth between lanes or ride on top of the line.

- Riders should avoid lingering in blind spots.

- Never ride while impaired by drugs, alcohol or fatigue.

- Constantly scan for changing conditions.



The Four R's or “Be-Attitudes” of Lane Splitting:

Be Reasonable, be Responsible, be Respectful, be aware of all Roadway and traffic conditions.

- Be Reasonable means not more than 10 MPH faster than traffic flow and not over 39 MPH.


- Be Responsible for your own safety and decisions.

  • Don't put yourself in dangerous positions.
  • If you can't fit, don't split.

- Be Respectful --- sharing the road goes both ways.

  • Don't rely on loud pipes to keep you safe, loud pipes often startle people and poison the attitude of car drivers toward motorcyclists.
  • Other vehicles are not required to make space for motorcycles to lane split.

- Be aware Roadways and traffic can be hazardous.

  • uneven pavement
  • wide trucks
  • distracted drivers
  • weather conditions
  • curves
  • etc.

Disclaimers:

These general guidelines are not guaranteed to keep you safe.

Lane splitting should not be performed by inexperienced riders. These guidelines assume a high level of riding competency and experience.

The recommendations contained here are only general guidelines and cannot cover all possible combinations of situations and variables.

Personal Safety: Every rider has ultimate responsibility for his or her own decision making and safety. Riders must be conscious of reducing crash risk at all times. California law requires all motorcycle riders and passengers wear a helmet that complies with the DOT FMVSS 218 standard.

Risk of getting a ticket: Motorcyclists who lane split are not relieved of the responsibility to obey all existing traffic laws. With respect to possible law enforcement action, keep in mind that it will be up to the discretion of the Law Enforcement Officer to determine if riding behavior while lane splitting is or was safe and prudent.

When is it NOT OK to split?

You should NOT lane split:

- If you can't fit.


- At a toll booth.


- If traffic is moving too fast or unpredictably.


- If dangerous road conditions exist --- examples include water or grit on the road, slippery road markings, road construction, uneven pavement, metal grates, etc.


- If you cannot clearly see a way out of the space you're going into (for example, if a van or SUV is blocking your view).


- Between trucks, buses, RVs, and other wide vehicles.


- Around or through curves.


- If you are not fully alert and aware of your surroundings.


- If you are unable to react to changing conditions instantaneously.


- If you don't feel comfortable with the situation.


Messages for Other Vehicle Drivers

1) Lane splitting by motorcycles is not illegal in California when done in a safe and prudent manner.

2) Motorists should not take it upon themselves to discourage motorcyclists from lane splitting.

3) Intentionally blocking or impeding a motorcyclist in a way that could cause harm to the rider is illegal (CVC 22400).

4) Opening a vehicle door to impede a motorcycle is illegal (CVC 22517).

5) Never drive while distracted.

6) You can help keep motorcyclists and all road users safe by



  • Checking mirrors and blind spots, especially before changing lanes or turning
  • Signaling your intentions before changing lanes or merging with traffic
  • Allowing more following distance, three or four seconds, when behind a motorcycle so the motorcyclist has enough time to maneuver or stop in an emergency

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I found no mention of stop signs. I've always wondered if it's legal to split lanes through traffic backed up at stop signs on the PCH where there either are four lanes (two in each direction, separated by dotted white) or riding along (or in?) the designated bicycle lane past single lane traffic backed up at a stop sign. Anyone know?

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http://apps.dmv.ca.gov/pubs/hdbk/traffic_lanes.htm

Bicycle Lanes

A bicycle lane is a designated traffic lane for bicyclists, marked by a solid white line, typically breaking into a dotted line ending before it reaches the corner. Different from a simple white line showing the edge of the road, a bicycle lane follows specific width requirements and is clearly marked as a bike lane.

  • Treat a bicycle lane the same as other traffic lanes. ( which you can lane split/share )
  • Do not turn into the lane if there is a bicyclist in the bike lane.
  • Do not obstruct bicycle traffic by reducing the width required for safe bicycle passage, typically 3 to 4 feet.

When you are making a right turn and are within 200 feet of the corner or other driveway entrance, you must enter the bicycle lane only after ensuring there is no bicycle traffic, and then make the turn. Do not drive in the bicycle lane at any other time. ( which goes against the "treat it like any other lane"...)

I could not find a specific law allowing lane splitting but it's obviously legal with some "guidelines"....a strange grey area. With most things, reasonableness is the key. I'm with ThumperBob and don't normally split lanes. I've done it twice for very slow or non moving traffic - think 805 S at the 5 S split on a Friday afternoon. My son does it daily two up.

I just don't like the risk / reward.

Seems the bike lane answer is contradictory. I guess you're legal within 200 feet of a corner - or driveway entrance - gotta be a lot of those in some areas. Again, reasonableness. If anyone ever gets a ticket for this, let me know. When I get done laughing at the ridiculousness of it, I'll write your Trial by Declaration.

Stop signs - seems legal as all are traffic lanes. I could explain "sharing" the lane by riding on- or just to the inside of - the white line.

Reasonableness, be safe.

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From what I know they use the term, "Safe and Prudent Manner." If the officer "feels" you were not operating in a safe and prudent manner you will probably be cited.

I saw this list yesterday and thought these are good ideas and guidelines that officers have probably used for awhile...

Yes'um and while the officer(s) must follow the written law, it is at her or his discretion as whether you are performing the act safely or not. So for the most part, sitting/backed up traffic and lane sharing at say 15mph probably won't get you a ticket. Do the same at 25 or greater and ticket time increases. Do it in moving or non-moving traffic at freeway speeds, well it's a ticket for sure. However, the officer has to be able to reach you to cite you i.e., will it be safe for he/she to catch you. And if I am not mistaken, you need to do it at the left hand of the lane.

I've had this discussion with officers back when I rode the dangerous streets.

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From what I know they use the term, "Safe and Prudent Manner." If the officer "feels" you were not operating in a safe and prudent manner you will probably be cited.

I saw this list yesterday and thought these are good ideas and guidelines that officers have probably used for awhile...

Yes'um and while the officer(s) must follow the written law, it is at her or his discretion as whether you are performing the act safely or not. So for the most part, sitting/backed up traffic and lane sharing at say 15mph probably won't get you a ticket. Do the same at 25 or greater and ticket time increases. Do it in moving or non-moving traffic at freeway speeds, well it's a ticket for sure. However, the officer has to be able to reach you to cite you i.e., will it be safe for he/she to catch you. And if I am not mistaken, you need to do it at the left hand of the lane.

I've had this discussion with officers back when I rode the dangerous streets.

I tried to find an actual law on the topic but couldn't. I'd appreciate a link if ya have one. Unless I missed it, I figure they didn't post a law on the CHP site, just guidelines. They did post laws for impeding a bike.

I remember reading something a few years ago about being to the left of the vehicle you're sharing with, too, but most go between the #1 (fast) lane and the #2, to the right of #1 and sometimes to the left of #2.

It seems the whole thing is subjective so you're open to officer discretion. I may have written 2 tickets per month back in my patrol days and this def was not a focus of mine.

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that's where I ride... to the right of the #1 lane... I feel that is the safest place to be

when splitting, likewise.

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From what I know they use the term, "Safe and Prudent Manner." If the officer "feels" you were not operating in a safe and prudent manner you will probably be cited.

I saw this list yesterday and thought these are good ideas and guidelines that officers have probably used for awhile...

Yes'um and while the officer(s) must follow the written law, it is at her or his discretion as whether you are performing the act safely or not. So for the most part, sitting/backed up traffic and lane sharing at say 15mph probably won't get you a ticket. Do the same at 25 or greater and ticket time increases. Do it in moving or non-moving traffic at freeway speeds, well it's a ticket for sure. However, the officer has to be able to reach you to cite you i.e., will it be safe for he/she to catch you. And if I am not mistaken, you need to do it at the left hand of the lane.

I've had this discussion with officers back when I rode the dangerous streets.

I tried to find an actual law on the topic but couldn't. I'd appreciate a link if ya have one. Unless I missed it, I figure they didn't post a law on the CHP site, just guidelines. They did post laws for impeding a bike.

I remember reading something a few years ago about being to the left of the vehicle you're sharing with, too, but most go between the #1 (fast) lane and the #2, to the right of #1 and sometimes to the left of #2.

It seems the whole thing is subjective so you're open to officer discretion. I may have written 2 tickets per month back in my patrol days and this def was not a focus of mine.

It sort of is subjective, but based on objective laws. I think I saw something years ago on it, but wouldn't even try to find it for you now as it probably would be daunting. The Moto book from the DMV will not have it, but the big book which most of will never see I beileve goes over the safety of it. Sorry, I'm not much more help. You can try picking a CHPs head to see if he'll open up. You might get better luck talking to a CHP motocop. I gave up on road riding, so I am worry free for many reasons.

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I sent them an email on the "contact" on their site. It took 'em a week to get back to me last time but I got an answer. Letcha know what comes back.

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When I got ... uh... into a discussion with a CHP officer on the way to ride Otay one day, I took the opportunity to pick his brain on a quite a few different topics, including lane splitting...

He was as vague as all get out... he said (as stated above) it was safe and prudent, and subjective, but there were some exact guidelines they follow... I "remember" him saying: 15 mph over prevailing traffic speeds, but not faster than 35 mph... in other words, if traffic is standing still, you could lane share @ 15 mph, but if it was going 20 or more, you could go 15 over or 35...

But we talked about a lot of things, and everything seemed to point to: he was a very normal guy with a difficult job, trying to keep the populace safe while doing his job with some common sense.

Headlight modulators- "hey, I think they're awesome if the keep people from pulling out in front of you... don't run them at night, obviously..."

Hyperlight (taillight "flash then solid")- "Yeah... it's kind of like tapping your brakes before you stop... I like them"

Blue windshields- "technically against the law, but a lot of guys, myself included, could care less"

Doing 80 in a 55- "ok buddy, slow it down..."

Only time in my life I deserved a ticket and did not get one... and guess what; It impacted me JUST as much as the fine would've... good job officer Todd! (still sorry about how late I was bowers)

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Well, that was quick.

Thank you for contacting the CHP. There is no CVC (CA Vehicle Code) laws for lane splitting. You have done your research and we respect your views on the topic. Currently, the California Vehicle Code does not exclude the practice of motorcycles from splitting or sharing traffic lanes. It is the view of the California Highway Patrol (CHP), lane splitting, while permissible should be done in a safe and prudent manner. The CHP does not have an official policy in regards to sharing lanes in order to split slower moving traffic. During motorcycle patrol training the CHP offers guidelines to their officers for splitting lanes.

The suggested practices include the following:

· Never split unless it is absolutely necessary.

· Maximum speed above prevailing speed of traffic you are splitting - 10 mph.

· Split when vehicles are side by side.

· Watch for gaps that a vehicle could move into as you are splitting.

· If traffic is stopped, watch for doors opening. Be cautious of extended mirrors or projecting loads.

· Watch for debris on the pavement along lane designation lines.

· Check the side mirror of vehicles to your right to determine if drivers are looking and appear aware of you approach.

· Illuminate headlight during daylight hours.

· Use horn if necessary; never use red light or siren while splitting.

The CHP has not conducted any studies, nor compiled any statistics regarding lane splitting of motorcycles. Additionally, I am unaware of any other published studies regarding lane splitting.

Thank you for contacting the California Highway Patrol.

Officer Rafael Cervantez

California Highway Patrol

Community Outreach and Media Relations

(916) 843-3215

601 N. 7th Street, Sacramento

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I've been a cop for almost 15 years. Here is how I view it from the seat of a patrol car:

Is there a specific law that outlaws lane splitting...No

Is there sections of the California vehicle code that can be used to cite someone for lane splitting...Yes, under certain circumstances. If you are being unsafe, you can get pulled over and cited.

As a side note, I recently tried to pull over a guy on a sport bike for speeding. As soon as I got close to him, he hit a switch and his license plate folded up so I couldn't read. He pulled into the bike lane and pinned it. Within seconds he was pulling away from me doing about 100 mph in the bike lane in heavy traffic...I watched him dissapear into the distance. If they want to get away, they can.

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