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Don't try mounting a tire after a few beer's with CID. What's that funny noise? 

0612182041.jpg

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Probably just put it there for safe keeping.  Never know when you'll need one!

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Hmmm, must be an SDAR thing.  I did a baja ride with another member that got a flat as we were leaving Tecate.  Tire had about three  1-inch gashes in it. We pulled into a llantera and found a tire iron inside the tire.  I'll try to dig up the pic.  

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That's what you get for not inviting me over to help supervise!! 

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Geez, what kind of beer were you guys drinking. :wacko:

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No one questioned my funky looking sprocket! 

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Just now, kkug said:

No one questioned my funky looking sprocket! 

Cush sprocket? 

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 Thought to my self, "Self, What, that looks like like an antique set-up?"  Not wanting to show my ignorance, I kept my head down. Kug, you may want to have your Wingman take a refresher course on Quality Control Supervision. 

      B)

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8 hours ago, simicrintz said:

I'm still wondering what the braided line is in the pic....

Still on tire mounting stand, rubber hose to not scratch wheel

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35 minutes ago, Bp619 said:

Still on tire mounting stand, rubber hose to not scratch wheel

For some reason I was viewing it (in my head) as the wheel being vertical.  Now that you explained it I realize the tire is horizontal. 

There is a saying "if you are the smartest guy in the room you're in the wrong room".  I have never been in that room.......

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11 hours ago, kkug said:

No one questioned my funky looking sprocket! 

Homemade?

Reminds me of the sprocket I had on my Taco 22 Mini Bike.

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Just now, kkug said:

http://www.cushdrive.com/  

 

Looks funky - one pound heavier - I don't care I am hopeing it's all good in long run to save my drive train. 

I wish my husaberg 570 had that when I bought it used with 8k miles and countershaft was destroyed, guy before me did tons of street. Now i have a ktm lc4 cush drive complete wheel but I like the sprocket idea better

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https://www.ktm-parts.com/OEMFINDER.html#/KTM/450_XCW_Engine_-_2016/Clutch/34|~48|~0005/34|~48|~0013

Part #8   =  Damping Rubber x 6

 

Changed mine at 5k miles.  Originals had measurable but not significant wear.    Do the experts believe there is a difference between hub dampers and clutch dampers?     2016 Xcw

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Agreed clutch dampers work but that's between motor and counter shaft, no dampers between wheel and countershaft and road vibrations

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Back a few years ago, when they first started putting the clutch dampers in the KTM's (EXC., XCW., etc.) there was some discussion by an esteemed panel of "experts" on KTM Talk. From what I remember, the conclusion was that the clutch dampers help a little bit. Better than no damping. The clutch dampers are a way to get some damping into the drive line without adding a lot of weight. It seems to me (non-expert), that the hub damping is a better way to cushion the whole drive line, and that is why street bikes do it that way, at the expense of a bit more weight.

A friend had an old '03 EXC (no dampers) with lots of miles on it. I think it was about 10k - 12k and he destroyed the splines on the c-shaft.

My 2012 EXC (with clutch dampers) has about 11,000 miles with no wear on those splines.

A  good general practice for splined shafts that see heavy shock loads is to use high pressure grease between the shaft and the gear or sprocket. It helps eliminate the fretting that eats up the splines. Any grease will help, but the high pressure stuff will stay there longer.

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HP Grease; Thanks I will go that route and swear off pavement.

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I worry more about the transmission teeth than the spline wearing. 

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